THE BEAUTY OF THE SILVRETTA

Photographer Ronald Lorenz has created a picture book on the Silvretta. Who knows better than him, then, where it is at its most beautiful? Three tips to open your eyes.

Ronald Lorenz has two great passions: he loves mountain-climbing and photography. They can be combined wonderfully. Last year he produced a picture book on the Silvretta. Who knows better than him, then, where it is at its most beautiful? Three tips to open your eyes.

1

You only deserve the mountain peaks if you love the mountain valleys
“If you just want to go quickly up to mountain peaks in the Silvretta, you miss the variety of its valleys,” says Ronald Lorenz. The Fimbatal valley, for example, starts off fairly broad, and is a gentle valley which narrows only slowly, becoming more inhospitable just towards the end. The Jamtal, on the other hand, is narrow and steep. Even in the summer you can feel here how dangerous it can be in the winter. Then again, Klostertal valley is a mixture of both landscapes. “And then on the other side, in Montafon, everything is completely different anyway,” says Lorenz.

2

You’ve only been to the top if you’ve been to the top

The journey itself is its own reward when you are walking, of course. But let’s not kid ourselves. “The best view, that great freedom, the whole panorama, you only get that right at the top,” says Ronald Lorenz. In his experience the best view the Silvretta offers is from the Fluchthorn. “You are right in the middle, you can see the other peaks and the valleys. You realise there how the glaciers change from year to year, how the rocks are broken down and reshape the landscape,” says Lorenz.

3

You have to be out early to catch the magic
There are mountain peaks which are overcrowded because everyone knows them. And there are other peaks which are no less spectacular, just not so well known. Such as Hennenkopf, for example. “If you set off before sunrise and climb up Hennenkopf, then you might catch sight of the most incredible colours,” says Ronald Lorenz – in particular when the rising sun transforms the cap of mist that often surrounds Piz Buin opposite into a gigantic red veil.